Mr. Schiff Returns to Washington

Saturday, June 23, 2012

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Till Death Do Us Part

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

It Couldn't Happen Here, It Does Happen There
The Value of American – and Afghan – Lives


"Do you do this in the United States? There is police action every day in the United States... They don't call in airplanes to bomb the place." – Afghan President Hamid Karzai denouncing U.S. air strikes on homes in his country, June 12, 2012

It was almost closing time when the siege began at a small Wells Fargo Bank branch in a suburb of San Diego, and it was a nightmare. The three gunmen entered with the intent to rob, but as they herded the 18 customers and bank employees toward a back room, they were spotted by a pedestrian outside who promptly called 911. Within minutes, police cars were pulling up, the bank was surrounded, and back-up was being called in from neighboring communities. The gunmen promptly barricaded themselves inside with their hostages, including women and small children, and refused to let anyone leave.

The police called on the gunmen to surrender, but before negotiations could even begin, shots were fired from within the bank, wounding a police officer. The events that followed – now known to everyone, thanks to 24/7 news coverage – shocked the nation. Declaring the bank robbers "terrorist suspects," the police requested air support from the Pentagon and, soon after, an F-15 from Vandenberg Air Force Base dropped two GBU-38 bombs on the bank, leaving the building a pile of rubble.

All three gunmen died. Initially, a Pentagon spokesman, who took over messaging from the local police, insisted that "the incident" had ended "successfully" and that all the dead were "suspected terrorists." The Pentagon press office issued a statement on other casualties, noting only that, "while conducting a follow-on assessment, the security force discovered two women who had sustained non-life-threatening injuries. The security force provided medical assistance and transported both women to a local medical facility for treatment." It added that it was sending an "assessment team" to the site to investigate reports that others had died as well.

Read more: here

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Police officers put on notice in Indiana: If they illegally raid the wrong home, private citizens can shoot back

Monday, June 18, 2012

(NaturalNews) Most of us are supportive of our local police departments but because of a lousy state Supreme Court decision in Indiana last year, residents of the state now have the right to shoot at officers in defense of their property if they believe they are being improperly raided.

Not surprisingly, most police officers are upset about the law, which was signed by Gov. Mitch Daniels in March, because they believe now it will be "open season" on law enforcement officers.

But supporters say the law will encourage nothing of the kind. They say its sole purpose is to allow homeowners the same rights they've always had - to defend their property with deadly force, if necessary, even if that means defending it against "public servants" who illegally enter homes and automobiles.

Here's how it all began.

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Speeding Praetorians

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

If “speeding” – defined as driving faster than the legally posted maximum velocity – is necessarily “unsafe,” why do cops do so routinely?
The answer, of course, is: Because they can.
More precisely, they can do so with impunity. Who watches the watchmen, after all?
Here is a recent – and particularly egregious – example:
Denver cop Derrick Saunders was caught doing 143 MPH in a 55 – while legally drunk (.089 BAC). The repercussions? A 42 day suspension. At first, he was at least fired. But Saunders, who like a lot of cops apparently does not believe that “speed kills” when he is the one speeding - appealed his firing. And the police union backed him up. To repeat: a drunk cop doing 143 MPH in a 55 is demanding his job back. And the police union is helping him get his job back. The full story is here.
Meanwhile, let’s consider what would have happened to a non-anointed Mere Ordinary in my own state of Virginia:
Va. defines “reckless driving” as exceeding the posted maximum speed by more than 20 MPH – or any speed over 80 MPH, anywhere. Note carefully that one’s driving is considered legally reckless merely as a function of speed. It is not a viable legal defense to argue that you were sober – and in full control of your car and posed no danger to anyone. Merely to be caught driving 80 MPH of faster ( that’s all of 10 MPH over the highway limit of 70 MPH) or faster than 20 MPH over any posted limit (so, for instance, 56 MPH in a posted 35 zone) constitutes “reckless” driving – ipso facto – which in Va. is a Class 1 misdemeanor criminal offense, not merely an infraction – like a standard speeding ticket. If convicted, you will have a permanent criminal record that will be indexed in the NCIC database (where murderers, rapists and others are cataloged), spend up to a year in jail, pay a $2,500 fine, and face the strong likelihood that your driving privileges will be suspended for six months – and the absolute certainty that you will pay extortionate insurance premiums for at least the next five years.

Read more: here

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